Who is John D. Adams/John D. Henion?

It's important to know all these families intermarry: Chamberlain, Henion, Parliament, Black, Turner, Willis, Davenport. Naturally, this means DNA lines are crossed repeatedly, and DNA matches may appear closer than they really are. Also, it's easy to mis-identify a "DNA match" because the family names are the same, only to discover the "match" is through … Continue reading Who is John D. Adams/John D. Henion?

Who Are the Parents of Mary Johnson of Vermillion County, Indiana?

I started on a journey to map every Hendricks, Hendrix, Hendrickson and Hendrixson in Kentucky from 1780-1840 to make sure I knew who everyone was, and which families they belonged to. Along the path, I stumbled across a Polly Hendrixon who married Isaac Johnston in Hardin County, Kentucky in 1816. This immediately captured my attention: … Continue reading Who Are the Parents of Mary Johnson of Vermillion County, Indiana?

Unparented Hendrickson Children: Richard, John, Alexander, and Mary.

There are four Hendrickson children in the Indiana area at the time that John and Sarah Hardin Hendrickson are there. I call them "unparented" because no one seemed to know who their parents were, and there were no existing records to prove parentage. They are: Richard Hendrickson who marries Margaret McKibbens (1831 Bartholomew County, Indiana) … Continue reading Unparented Hendrickson Children: Richard, John, Alexander, and Mary.

The Various Colonial Era Hendrickson and Hendricks Families (and their DNA)

Note: this is a work in progress. I'll update it as I find more information. Just when you think you've never met another Hendrickson besides your closest family members, let me introduce you to the wide world of Hendricksons and Hendricks in the Colonial era in America. These are families that live in America from … Continue reading The Various Colonial Era Hendrickson and Hendricks Families (and their DNA)

DNA Proof That There Are Four Distinct Hendricks and Hendrickson Families in Colonial South-western and South-central Pennsylvania

In Colonial era south-central and southwestern Pennsylvania (1760s-1780s), there are at least FOUR lines of Hendricks/on families, all with different DNA. Because migration patterns were similar for early Americans, it's not uncommon for two families with the same name to be in the same place at the same time -- and NOT be related at … Continue reading DNA Proof That There Are Four Distinct Hendricks and Hendrickson Families in Colonial South-western and South-central Pennsylvania